Lego Galactica Clusterfrak So Big It Can Probably Crush a Real Cylon Baseship

via Gizmodo by Jesus Diaz on 1/26/09

I’m fraking being blown away by the last episodes of Galactica, so when I saw this huge Lego clusterfrak of Colonial Vipers and Raptors, complete with a 13-foot BSG hangar, I had to post them.

Some of them are truly great, specially pink Viper and the Raptor with all the Colonial Marines, ready to kick Cylon minifig ass.

This Lego Galactica fest was made with the people below, members ChiefLUG. [Brothers Brick]

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Gigapan Imager used to craft 1,474 megapixel image of Obama’s inauguration

via Engadget by Darren Murph on 1/25/09

In theory, at least, we already knew that the Gigapan Imager was capable of some amazing things. This, friends, is proof. David Bergman strapped the device and his Canon G10 onto a rail at Barack Obama’s inauguration and snapped 220 images. After giving his MacBook Pro 6.5 hours to compile a two gigabyte image, he hosted it up on his website for people to zoom around on. We’ll caution you — you can easy kill a few hours checking out faces and such if you end up visiting the read link, but it’s totally worth it.

[Via Gadling]

Details on AT&T’s 3G MicroCell: everything but the date and price

via Engadget by Chris Ziegler on 1/25/09

T-Mobile has HotSpot @Home, Sprint has AIRAVE, and Verizon has its Wireless Network Extender, leaving just AT&T among the States’ big four carriers without a launched WiFi or femtocell solution for extending signals into the home — but it looks like that’s finally getting close to changing. We know that they’ve been in the process of trialing some units recently, and tipsters have observed that there’s now a pretty slick site launched on AT&T’s domain for its 3G MicroCell, an indication that they might be looking to go retail eventually. There’s quite a bit of detail here; from the picture, we can make out that the unit comes from Cisco (versus Samsung for Sprint and Verizon), and like its competitors, the MicroCell will require a broadband connection to operate. It’ll cover up to 5,000 square feet, allow up to four simultaneous voice or data connections (locked down so that your neighbors can’t pilfer the signal), and most interestingly, will only work with 3G phones. We’ve heard that femtocells are more difficult to manage in a 2G GSM environment than in CDMA and WCDMA — hence the 3G requirement — but the cells offered by Sprint and Samsung only offer 2G coverage, so AT&T’s arguably got an advantage here. We still don’t know exactly when this is coming or for how much dough, but the site makes mention of a “3G MicroCell service plan,” so we’d count on a fee for the pleasure of extending AT&T’s network on their behalf. Follow the break for AT&T’s full rundown of the device.

How to Get Your Copy of Windows 7 on Friday

via Wired Top Stories by Michael Calore on 1/8/09

Windows7

Microsoft will make the first public beta of Windows 7, the next version of its desktop operating system, available as a free download on Friday. There are several limitations, however, so even if you’re excited and committed to trying out Windows 7 Beta 1 on your home PC, check out this list of rules, requirements and considerations.

We culled this list from a post on the official Windows blog and its comments, so check it out before taking the plunge:

  • Windows 7 Beta 1 will be made available for a limited time during the day on January 9, 2009.
  • Visit the Windows 7 page on Microsoft’s website for the link.
  • It will only be made available to the first 2.5 million people to download the code. Demand will be huge, so prepare to act quickly.
  • Microsoft has not announced a specific time on Friday for the release, but we can expect it will be later in the day so the west coast of North America isn’t left out.
  • Windows 7 Beta 1 will be offered as an ISO image. It’s around 2.5 or 3 gigabytes, so you will need a DVD burner if you want to install it.
  • You will be required to register before downloading so Microsoft can give you a product key.
  • It will be build 7000.
  • The beta will only support Windows Vista SP1 to Windows 7 upgrades. If you’re not running Vista SP1 right now, upgrade before you try to install the Windows 7 beta.
  • There is also a clean install option for the Win7 beta.
  • There is no upgrade path from XP.
  • There’s only one version of the beta, which Microsoft says “is roughly equivalent the Ultimate edition of Windows Vista.”
  • The Windows 7 Beta will expire on August 1. You will probably be forced to go back to using Vista SP1 on August 1 (or maybe upgrade to Win7 Beta 2?).
  • English, German, Japanese, Arabic, and Hindi versions will be available Friday.
  • Both 32-bit and 64-bit versions will be available (except for Hindi, which only gets a 32-bit version).
  • If you’re upgrading, remember to back up your PC. It’s a beta, stupid!

If you miss out, there will be other ways to get the beta in the near future. It’s likely Microsoft will be handing out hard DVDs of the code at developer events and consumer conferences throughout the year. And of course, (cough) there’s always BitTorrent.

Windows 7 Should be a Fixta Free For All

via ZDNet Blogs by Jason Perlow on 1/6/09

https://i2.wp.com/blogs.zdnet.com/perlow/images/fixta2.jpg

Okay, never mind that I’m a dinosaur with an affinity for 1990’s era User Interfaces – I think even my best critics will very likely agree with me that Windows 7, for all of its performance improvements and bling, is essentially one big service deluxe pack for Windows Vista. It’s the Windows Vista that customers were promised when they bought “Vista Capable” PC’s 3 years ago, and despite the rest of us dinosaurs that are set in our ways about the way we like to work, it’s the Windows Vista that even Micosoft’s most ardent supporters hoped that would finally replace Windows XP. Windows 7 is the Vista that we were guaranteed would work properly, the first time around.

Taking a page from the 1955 Brooklyn Dodgers, Windows 7 and it’s accompanying sales propaganda is the Microsoft corporate mantra equivalent of “Wait ’till next year” that everyone is hoping may actually result in that all-elusive pennant win — the end-user and corporate acceptance that Windows Vista was never able to achieve.

Click on the “Read the rest of this entry” link below for more.

Let’s face it, Windows 7 is Windows Vista Service Release 2, more than a service pack but less than a major release, with only a few added extra features, or as I am now in the custom of calling it, Windows Fixta. And since Windows 7 is essentially a performance and usability fix for a defective product, I’m of the increasing opinion that a Windows 7 upgrade should be free to anyone who was conned into buying Windows Vista.

Yes, you heard me. If you own a copy of Windows Vista — Microsoft should be giving you a download entitlement to whatever corresponding version you have. So if you have Home, you should get Windows 7 Home. If you have Ultimate, you should get Windows 7 Ultimate. For Microsoft to do anything less would be a disservice to their loyal customers, especially to the enterprises that actually bought into Enterprise Agreements for Vista desktops. It isn’t just good business for Microsoft to redeem itself in this way, it’s simply the right thing to do. Anything less than a complete “Mea culpa, we’ll do anything to make this up to you” move by Microsoft is likely to open them up to further litigation, especially by angry EU lawmakers who are just looking for another excuse to hit the company with billions more in fines as well as an expansion of existing class action in the United States.

As reported by Mary Jo Foley today, selected PC OEMs will begin offering free upgrades from Vista this summer, but these upgrades will not be retroactive. Microsoft needs to address their loyal customers and early adopters with free certificates NOW.

Should Vista users get Fixta For Free? Talk Back and Let Me Know.