AN OPEN LETTER TO SONY CORPORATION – PSP

I know i venting here, but i needed to post this so someone other then a computer would read it. I have no idea if anyone as unhappy as i am with this but i sure am.


I emailed Sony today, and let them know. At least i vented
——————–
Sony Computer Entertainment America
Human Resources
919 East Hillsdale Boulevard, 2nd Floor
Foster City, CA 94404
800-345-7669


To whom it may concern,

I originally purchased my PSP system during launch v.PSP1001 and have used it and been have happy with it all this time thru the numerous systems software upgrades that have added additional software functionality to my system allowing me to further enhance the unit singnificantly.

However; over his past week, i have been trying to install Skype onto my init after seeing many of my friends and colleges using the software on their units. To my complete disatisfaction and shock, Skype and a number of functionality is not available to version 1000 systems. The launch systems. The system that i have is version # 1001.

Skype and many other ‘enhanced’ software upgrades, are available on system hardware version # 2000 / 3000 (the newer, slimmer, cheaper, better) version of the PSP but not on the version #1000 (the original, more expensive, thicker, early adopter, Sony loyal) users such as myself.

I must say that i find this very disturbing, and borderline insulting specially as a user who did dish out near $300 for the original unit (with tax) on launch day. Only to find that the newer, cheaper unit, ($199) is so much better is Sony has completely neglected the original user base who made the PSP what it is today by spending so much money on the system, by trusting in Sony Corporation and it’s products and now being left, forgotten, made obsolete with a system that still is not!

How insulting it is that NO effort was made to make the original v1000 hardware system fully compatible with all other software that has come since is truly an abomination and a kick to the face of all those users who trusted in Sony Corporation. I am dismayed that my unit is not functional as all other units are even as it stands in perfectly working order.

All efforts should have been made to make all PSP hardware version fully compatible with all software to be approved for the PSP system. No exceptions. How you can allow this is truly and slap in the face across all those hundreds of thousands of customers that have purchased the original unit. With Sony Corporation basically saying “Go out and buy a new PSP and throw away the old one, it’s no good no more. Pollute the environment!”

You should make all units fully compatible with everything immediately, or exchange v1000 hardware version to support you own current standers.

I am sure not to even get a response to this, but i voice my opinion… and you KNOW that theres ONE customer who is NOT a happy customer with you today.

You may contact me if you would like. You can use the email on the top of this blog, i will be sure to get it.

Sincerely,
Lohan

SOLAQUA, a concept to use heat and UV rays to disinfect water

via DVICE Atom Feed by Kevin Hall on 5/13/09
SOLAQUA, a concept to use heat and UV rays to disinfect water

The SOLAQUA by designer Jason Lam is a concept for a passive way to purify water using both heat and UV rays (so, in other words, leaving water out in the sun). Each petal that extends from the main unit — which folds up as to be easy to carry — contains several 10 liter, clear tubes of water that’ll have the water inside entirely and thoroughly bombarded by the sun. Filling the tubes up is easy, as SOLAQUA automatically funnels it down into them, rather than making someone fill the bottles one by one.

Boiling water is one of the easiest methods of disinfecting the liquid, though a filter needs to be used to get out any solid pollutants — which is why the SOLAQUA includes a built-in filter of sari cloth — but the water doesn’t even have to be all that hot if it’s going to sit out for a while. Boiling just speeds things up. UV rays, as well, are popular for purifying, and the petals of the SOLAQUA would direct them straight through the bottles.

Check out the pictures below for more of the SOLAQUA.

Muji’s CD player makes me want to start listening to CDs again

via DVICE Atom Feed by Adam Frucci on 5/14/09
Muji's CD player makes me want to start listening to CDs again

Sure, CDs may be a dying medium, but if you still use the discs due to, you know, having purchased them for years and years, you might as well have a classy way to play them.

This Muji CD player is simple and classic, mounting on the wall and showing your disc spinning as it plays. In order to get it to play, simply tug on the cord hanging underneath it. Other controls, such as volume and track select, are on the top. Sure, for $178 you could get a few boom boxes, but this is classy, and that’s gotta count for something.

Muji via Technabob

Head-to-Head Comparison: Cool-er vs. Kindle 2

via DVICE Atom Feed by Charlie White on 5/14/09
Head-to-Head Comparison: Cool-er vs. Kindle 2

Now that the Amazon Kindle is a huge hit, it’s time for upstart Interead to sashay in with its multi-hued $250 Cool-er. The target date for the launch is just before Memorial Day, with the new reader officially available in all eight colors on May 29.

Take a look at our comparison between the two e-readers, where the Cool-er’s specs are listed first, compared with Amazon Kindle 2 specs (in parenthesis):

  • Price: $250 ($359)
  • Dimensions: 7.2 x 4.6 x .43 inches (8″ x 5.3″ x 0.36″)
  • Weight: 6.2 ounces (10.2 ounces)
  • Screen Size: 6 inches (6 inches)
  • DPI: 170 pixels per inch (150 pixels per inch)
  • Levels of Greyscale: 8 (16)
  • Touchscreen: No (No)
  • Storage: 1GB (2GB)
  • Memory Expansion: SD, up to 4GB (none)
  • Processor: 400MHz (532MHz)
  • Battery Life (single charge): 8000 pages (Read on a single charge for up to 4 days with wireless on)
  • Wireless: No (Yes)
  • Formats: JPEG, PDF, EPUB, TXT, MP3 (Kindle AZW, TXT, Audible AAX, MP3, unprotected MOBI, PRC natively; PDF, HTML, DOC, JPEG, GIF, PNG, BMP through conversion.)
  • Bookstore Titles: Over 750,000 (Over 275,000)

Coolreaders and Amazon Kindle 2

Body Check Ball tells the real story of your body’s condition

via DVICE Atom Feed by Charlie White on 5/14/09
Body Check Ball tells the real story of your body's condition

Scales don’t lie, but stepping on one doesn’t tell you the whole truth about the condition of your body. For a more accurate assessment, you’ll need this Body Check Ball to demonstrate to you in no uncertain terms the wages of your slothful sins.

Hold it in both hands, and it sends a weak current through you, measuring body fat, bone density and percentage of muscle. Then you can read ’em and weep on its LCD screen, tracking your progress — or lack thereof — from day to day.

Is this one of those devices that gives you too much information? Depending on your degree of fitness, that knowledge could be $39 worth of bragging rights or shame.

Japan Trend Shop, via Oh Gizmo

Hot Rod couch is one ridiculous piece of furniture

via DVICE Atom Feed by Adam Frucci on 5/14/09
Hot Rod couch is one ridiculous piece of furniture

This couch is, well, a one-of-a-kind object. It’s a hot rod couch, and it can be yours for a mere $45,000. What a deal!

Sure, there’s no way it’ll go with anything in your home, but come on, it’s so crazy looking! It sort of looks like a hot rod! Mixed with an uncomfortable couch! I’m sure this will sell in no time.

Zaha Hadid unveils latest alien spacecraft disguised as common Earth structure

via DVICE Atom Feed by Adario Strange on 5/15/09
Zaha Hadid unveils latest alien spacecraft disguised as common Earth structure

The age of mobile museums and public pavilions continues to be pushed forward by futuristic designer Zaha Hadid. For an upcoming ecology-focused exhibit in Chicago’s Millennium Park, the London-based designer created a seashell-meets-spacecraft design that would be right at home in the 24th century.

Constructed using light-weight aluminum, the structure uses fabric for its walls and allows light in from all angles. Dubbed The Hadid Pavilion, the design will be on display from June 19 through October 31, and you can find more information here.
Via Tuvie

xYz handheld rumored to combine Xbox 360 and Zune

via DVICE Atom Feed by Adam Frucci on 5/15/09
xYz handheld rumored to combine Xbox 360 and Zune

Here’s a juicy rumor: could Microsoft be working on a portable gadget that combines the Xbox 360 with the Zune? Maybe!

The project, codenamed “xYz,” is said to feature a WVGA touchscreen and a way to play music and movies on both the device as well as the Xbox 360. Basically, it’s going to be a connected handheld gaming system with rich multimedia features. Sounds interesting, but will it actually come to exist? Time will tell.

Team Xbox via Gizmodo

Transformers style truck converts into a train, runs on algae.

via DVICE Atom Feed by Michael Trei on 5/16/09
Transformers style truck converts into a train, runs on algae.

Trains are the most efficient way to move lots of big stuff over land, but the rail lines don’t always go to where the goods need to be. With a special combination wheel design that can quickly convert from rail to road use, the Chiron transporter looks like something Optimus Prime would use when moving house. But by eliminating the need to shift the container over to a truck for the final leg of its journey, the Chiron is designed to save a lot of time and energy. Continuing the green theme, the Chiron’s power is supposedly generated by an ‘algae fuel cell’, although no further information about how this wondrous power plant actually works is given. From the picture, it looks like the Chiron also works on good old fashioned electrified lines.

While I could come up with a host of practical problems including a lack of rear access for loading the container, you’ve got to admit that it looks pretty cool.

Treehugger.com

How To Install Windows 7 On Almost Any Netbook

via Gizmodo by John Herrman on 5/16/09


Windows 7 is free for now, and works extremely well on netbooks. That said, installing the OS on these tiny laptops—especially low-end models—can be daunting. Here’s how to do it, the easy way:

If the Release Candidate is any indication (and it should be), then Windows 7 will be a nice upgrade for any Windows user. The new OS, however, is a huge step up for netbook users. Vista is notoriously poorly suited to netbooks; a buggy resource hog that subjects its users to incessant dialog boxes and requires far too many clicks to perform basic tasks, it’s kind of a nightmare to use on a 9-inch laptop with a 1.5-inch trackpad.

Windows XP has been given a boost by netbooks, as its system requirements—more-or-less decided in 2001—are more in line with the specs hardware like the Eee PC and Mini 9. But let’s face it: XP is nearly a decade old. Its user experience is trumped by free alternatives like Ubuntu Netbook Remix and Linpus, and it’s not at all optimized for solid-state drives—especially cheap ones. This means that on low-end, SSD-based netbooks, it borders on unusable.

Hence, Windows 7. It’s noticeably faster than Vista on low-spec machines, properly optimized for netbook hardware, and, most importantly, free (for now). Thing is, installation isn’t quite as easy as it is on a regular PC—in fact, it can be a pain in the ass: netbooks don’t have DVD drives, which means you’ve either got to get your hands on an external drive or boot from a USB stick for a clean install. Furthermore, smaller SSDs, like the 8GB units in popular versions of the Dell Mini 9 and Acer Aspire One, make a default installation impossible, or at least impractically tight. Luckily, there are simple methods to deal with both of these problems. Let’s get started.

What You’ll Need

• A netbook (Minimum 1GB of RAM, 8GB storage space)

• A 4GB or larger USB drive

• A Windows 7 RC Image (details below)

• A Windows XP/Vista PC or a Mac to prepare the flash drive

• For low-end netbooks, lots (and lots) of time

Getting Windows 7

Downloading Windows 7 is a piece of cake. Just navigate to this page and download the 32-bit version. You’ll need to get a free Windows Live ID if you don’t already have one, but this takes about two minutes.

Microsoft will then give you your very own Windows 7 License key, valid until June 1st of next year. (Although after March 1st, it’ll drive you to the edge of sanity by shutting off every two hours. But that’s a different story, and March is a long way off). Microsoft will then offer up your ISO through a nifty little download manager applet, complete with a “resume” function. There are ways to sidestep this, but don’t: you’d be surprised how hard it is to keep a single HTTP connection alive for long enough to download a 2.36GB file.

Preparing Your Flash Drive

This is the annoying part, but it’s not necessarily that difficult. Here are some guides, by OS (some linked for length):
Windows XP
Windows Vista
• Mac OS X (courtesy of Ubuntu, funnily enough):

1. Open a Terminal (under Utilities)

2. Run diskutil list and determine the device node assigned to your flash media (e.g. /dev/disk2)

3. Run diskutil unmountDisk /dev/diskN (replace N with the disk number from the last command; in the previous example, N would be 2)

4. Execute sudo dd if=/path/to/downloaded.iso of=/dev/diskN bs=1m (replace /path/to/downloaded.iso with the path where the image file is located; for example, ./windows7.iso)

5. Run diskutil eject /dev/diskN and remove your flash media when the command completes (this can take a few hours on slower drives)


Starting Your Install

Ok! Now you’ve got a bootable flash drive, and you’re ready to start installing. It should go without saying, but once you start this process, you’ll lose all existing data on your netbook, so you should back up any important files before going through with anything from here forward.

Insert your USB drive and reboot your netbook. As soon as your BIOS screen flashes, you should see instructions for a) changing your netbook’s boot order or b) entering its BIOS setup. In the first situation, simply assign the USB drive as the first boot device. In the second, navigate through your BIOS settings until you find a “Default Boot Order” page, and do the same thing there.

From there, you should see the first Windows 7 installation screens. Anyone with a 16GB or larger storage device in their netbook can just follow the instructions until the installation completes, and skip the next step.

If your SSD is smaller than 16GB, or if you just want to save some space, do what they say, but only until the first reboot. After the Windows 7 installer has restarted your computer, you’ll need to modify the boot order again. Do not allow installation to continue! Manually change the boot order to prioritize the USB drive again, just as you did at the beginning of the installation.

Compression!
Simple file compression is the secret to squeezing Windows 7 onto your skimpy 8GB SSD. Now that the Windows 7 installer has copied most of its system files to your drive, you’re going to tighten them up with Windows’ trust old “Compact” command. Here’s what you do, as described by Electronic Pulp:

Choose “Repair” at the Windows 7 Setup screen, go to “Command Prompt” and enter the following code:

d: (or whatever drive letter is assigned to your SSD)
cd \windows\system32
compact.exe d:\*.* /c /s /i

And wait. And wait and wait and wait. This can take anywhere from eight hours to two days, so you’ll want to set your netbook down in a corner and forget about it for a while. [Note: compressing so many of your system files does have a performance cost, but in day-to-day use, it’s negligible]

Once this is done, reboot the netbook again and let it continue the installation as normal. That’s it!

All said and done, an 8GB SSD should have nearly 2GB of free space left—not much, but enough to work with. And given that most netbooks come with inbuilt, flush SD expansion slots, and that high-capacity SD cards are extremely affordable, having a small amount of space on your root drive isn’t at all prohibitive.

Setup and Customization Help

Windows 7 works fairly well out of the box, but as with any new Windows installation, you’re going to need to download some drivers. Vista drivers usually do the trick, but sometimes workarounds are necessary. Thankfully, most popular netbooks have spawned helpful fan forums, many of which have Windows 7 subforums. Some of the best:

So there you go! Enjoy your new Windows 7 netbook! Please share your experiences in the comments-your feedback is a huge benefit to our Saturday guides. And of course, have a great weekend!