iPhone 3GS Review

via Gizmodo by Jason Chen on 6/17/09

What’s the point in buying a new iPhone if it looks exactly like the old one? Because once you start using it, the speed of the iPhone 3GS will amaze you.

There’s a reason why Apple called this the iPhone 3GS for Speed and not the 3GC for “compass” or 3GV for “video recording.” Speed is the central upgrade here, and probably is the single biggest reason you would upgrade to a 3GS from a 3G. And if you’re coming in as a virgin iPhone user, there’s definitely no question: The 3GS is worth an extra $100.

That declaration may be weird to most of us since we usually look for features, and not specs, when we’re evaluating phones—and iPhone 3GS doesn’t blow us out in the feature department. Instead, it’s like getting a bigger TV or a faster car. Your old machine works just fine, but once you’ve tried the new one for a week, you’ll never want to go back, even if it costs you a little extra.

Like we said, from the outside the 3GS is exactly the same as the 3G. It’s slightly heavier and has glossy text on the back, but if Steve Jobs whipped one out in public before it was announced, you wouldn’t have been able to tell the difference.

By holding the 3GS next to the 3G, you’ll notice that the screen is slightly more reflective because of the new fingerprint resistant oleophobic coating. It even has a little bit of a rainbow effect if you reflect a monitor with it. Surprisingly, the coating actually works in preventing a good deal of fingerprints and face grease, and it allows the phone to still be smooth and usable even if there are fingerprints on the surface.

The shot above illustrates the fact. The two phones may look similar in how much finger and face grease are on the screen, but the iPhone 3GS is still usable and doesn’t have the problem of “sticking” in certain areas that are slightly greasier. It’s also easier to clean just by wiping on your shirt. The glass treatment won’t eliminate smudging from your bodily secretions altogether, but it’s a very useful improvement for something you’re touching all the time.

The 3GS display is ever-so-slightly warmer than the 3G’s, having a yellow/orangish tint when viewed side by side. If you remember, the 3G’s screen was also warmer than the 2G’s. It’s not distracting in any way, and the warm screen is slightly easier on your eyes even if the brightness is bumped up high.

The video really shows how fast the iPhone 3GS is. Safari, Email, Camera all load noticeably faster than on the iPhone 3G (both running 3.0 software). Even booting the phone takes about half the time. Apps with long load times, like Sims 3, Oregon Trail or Metal Gear Touch all show how much faster you get up and running on the new device. Seriously, everything is faster. It’s exactly the same experience as switching from a two- or three-year-old computer to something brand new. Your apps all look the same, but they load and run much more smoothly. Even if you’re doing the same things on both machines, the new machine is that much better to work on.

What does this speed increase mean for future iPhone apps and games? With the iPhone 3GS running on a 600MHz CPU with 256MB RAM (up from 400MHz and 128MB), there’s a much higher performance ceiling for apps to hit. The OpenGL ES 2.0 graphics standard that’s now supported paves the way for an impressive visual boost. Hubert (a former Nvidia developer) from Ubergizmo says it’s somewhere along the lines of going from Half Life 1 to Half Life 2, which is essentially going up a console generation. Gamers should pay attention.

Like we said before, the iPhone 3G will still run most of the games for the near future. That 40 million unit potential market of iPhone/iPod Touch devices is too big to just ignore and put out an app just for 3GS phones, so your old phone will still be able to keep up. But developers are like alcoholics. If you put more system resources in front of them, they can’t help but use all of it just because they can. Also, they drink a lot.

Apple hates to emphasize specs in products like the iPhone 3GS, but even they couldn’t resist bragging about the speed boost. That S is there for a reason.

The 3GS also has a 3-megapixel camera, adding auto focus and video recording. You even get an interface that lets you tap on a section of the screen that you want to focus on and the phone will automatically adjust the focus to that point in space.

By tapping on the screen and activating the auto-everything—not just auto focus but improved auto exposure and auto white balance—you’re gaining the ability to control more of what your shots look like. It’s most obvious in macro shots where the subject is only a few inches away (above). Those two photos were shot from the exact same distance in the exact same lighting. You can also see in the gallery below that the 3GS is slightly better in low-light conditions (something the 3G was no good at), as well as having better overall auto white balance.

I wouldn’t say it’s a mindblowing revolutionary step for the iPhone camera, but it’s definitely more than just shoving in more megapixels and leaving it at that.

The video quality, on the other hand, is pretty good for a cellphone. Apple claims up to 30 frames per second, and as this video of an HD recording of SNL shows, it comes pretty damn close. Even if it’s not quite 30FPS at all times, the video is smooth as hell. Recording still isn’t great in low light since it’s a physical limitation of cameras in general, but at least it’s fluid. The tap-to-focus (and re-expose) feature also carries over to video, which you can use to “aim” your camera at a part of the scene.

You’ll also want to use the quick trimming feature before you upload your videos directly to YouTube to cut out the excess at the front and back of your clips. The quick trim is just like trimming a clip in iMovie, with the yellow draggable borders. Apple says that the 3G doesn’t have video because the old processor isn’t capable of handling it, and after taking the 30FPS videos on the 3GS, we can believe that they didn’t want to settle for just 15FPS videos.

Data hogs will also be happy about the increased 7.2Mbps data speeds the 3GS can achieve. We used the Speedtest app in the App Store and over multiple days and multiple times (early, mid-day and late at night), clocked the 3GS at an average of 1568Kbps, whereas the 3G only measured 1165Kbps. Their uploads were relatively equal, at 226Kbps (3GS) and 209Kbps (3G), but there was a noticeable difference in latency with the 3GS pulling ahead at 174ms to the 3G’s 231ms. Although on average the 3GS scored about 50% higher than the 3G, occasionally, in individual runs, it could have ranged anywhere from twice as fast to about the same speeds.

The speed boost for downloads is interesting, seeing as AT&T hasn’t even begun to really roll out their 7.2 HSPA in very many places yet. Since we’re testing this before the actual 3GS release date, we’ll see how much loads of 3GS users will impact overall speeds, and we’ll see how fast the 3GS speeds increase once AT&T has the infrastructure to support it.

If you’re talking practical use scenarios right now, the increased network speeds and the increased processing speeds help to cut down wait times for both the email and Safari and whatever other app you use that grabs a bunch of data often. Even if you’re on Wi-Fi, the fact that there’s a faster processor on board mean that you’re going to be done faster than on the 3G.

The compass app, along with the magnetometer, is great at pointing you somewhere in the general direction of North. It also doesn’t matter which way you’re holding the phone—either parallel or perpendicular to the ground—the arrow and numbers will still more or less give you a sense of where you’re facing.

As a bonus, if you hit the “find me” button in Google Maps a second time after it’s located your GPS position, it’ll re-orient your map to reflect the way you’re facing. It would have been extremely useful when I was on foot, lost in San Francisco trying catch the last train, not knowing which way was which since the street signs are so small and the blocks are so large. If I had this, I wouldn’t have to have gone a block in the wrong direction just to figure out I should have been heading the other way.

The compass may not sound like a great feature, but apps like Layar, an augmented reality browser, are now capable of running on the 3GS with the help of the magnetometer and GPS.

Nike+ support is something that I’ve been looking forward to for a long time—so much so that I even bought an iPod Touch 2G to use it. Well, it’s here, and it works. The app is exactly like the one on the 2G Touch, and enables you all the running features you’re accustomed to using on any other Nike+ device. What’s nice about using your phone when running is that you always have your phone with you, and if you have a stereo Bluetooth headset, you’ll be able to listen to music, run and answer a call if need be.

Voice control actually works. As long as you know the right commands, like “call” for calling someone on your contact list and “dial” if you want to dial a number. The accuracy is quite high, and the app can recognize what you’re saying as long as there’s not too much background noise. It’s also fairly smart. If you say “call Mike” and you have multiple Mikes in your list, the iPhone will say the names of all your Mikes and ask you to be more specific.

The song control works, but gets confused occasionally because bands have weird names that aren’t exactly English—they just share the same letters. The iPhone kept confusing “Phoenix” with “INXS” or “DMX”, for example, but managed to actually get commands like “pause music”, “who is this song by”, “previous track” “what song is playing?”, “shuffle” and “play more like this” correct. And if you’re worried about figuring out what to say to control your phone, just activate the Voice Control function and watch the screen; eventually the command you want will come floating by in the background.

What’s also surprising about the 3GS is that you wouldn’t expect battery life to be improved, but it is. Apple’s figures that measured improvement over the 3G in every category except 3G calling were more or less what we found in our own testing, which means you should be able to last the entire day on one charge with no problems. Plus, since the phone is faster, you’ll probably spend less time looking up directions or getting to a restaurant’s web page—which also saves battery.

The iPhone 3GS is not an insignificant step forward in the iPhone family. The Nike+ support, magnetometer (compass), video recording, voice command, better camera, better battery life and faster data network are all improvements nobody would call a step backwards. But the biggest day-to-day improvement over the 3G is undoubtedly the increased processing speed, which is why Apple called this phone the 3GS (with the S standing for super fast) in order to designate that it’s basically the 3G, but better.

3G users have the unfortunate question of asking themselves whether or not they want to spend the $399/$499 to upgrade to the 3GS right now. If you’re eligible to upgrade in July, August or September, AT&T’s letting you do so at the full subsidized $199/$299 price. If not, you’ll have to wait until your 18 months are up. It’s definitely a better phone, but AT&T’s plan of making early adopters wait another six months from now until they can get the standard $199/$299 price is frustrating, since we’ll already be halfway into the iPhone 3GS lifecycle. And by then, it’ll be worth waiting until June 2010 for a true revolutionary jump in iPhone design, instead of just an evolutionary improvement on the 3G.

Our first generation iPhone review verdict was to wait. Our iPhone 3G review gave the go-ahead to finally mount up. The only issue with the iPhone 3GS, if you already have the 3G, is that it’s not all that different of an experience.

Like I said in the Palm Pre review, I’m a bit bored of the iPhone look and feel. If you’re looking for something new, something different and something you’re not quite familiar with, there’s the Pre or the MyTouch 3G. But as a whole, the iPhone 3GS is the best all-around smartphone available. If you’re looking for a refined, augmented version of what you already know, a phone that, not for nothing, runs all the tens of thousands of apps on the App Store, choose the iPhone 3GS.

[Apple]

New Facebook Page for Infoblog.us


We’ve just created a Facebook page for Infoblog.us.

We will add site updates and happening on the backside on the site for anyone who would like to join and help contribute to the the Blog in any way.

Just follow the link above or bellow.

Thanks,
Infoblog.us Staff

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Infoblogus/90339184475

Torrent iPhone OS 3.0 Naming Guide for iPhone 2G, 3G, and iPod Touch

via Gizmodo by Jesus Diaz on 6/10/09

If you are still looking for the iPhone OS 3.0 Golden Master in Torrent and you are not sure about what to download, here’s what you should look for (extra bonus: It works with with the iPhone 1st Generation.)

iPhone OS 3.0 Gold Master Final for iPhone 1st Generation: Search for iPhone1,1_3.0_7A341_Restore.ipsw

• iPhone OS 3.0 Gold Master Final for iPhone 3G: Search for iPhone1,2_3.0_7A341_Restore.ipsw

• iPhone OS 3.0 Gold Master Final for iPod Touch: Search for iPod2,1_3.0_7A341_Restore.ipsw

[Thanks Adam Curry]

Chanel Brings High Fashion to Automobiles

via Popgadget: Personal Tech for Women by sherri on 6/10/09

We’ve seen quite a few fashion houses work with automakers to create designer vehicles. Usually the fashion house designs the interior while the car company designs the exterior. But if South Korean car design student Jinyoung Jo has her way, high end fashion vehicle will soon be taking their turn on the catwalk.

chanel_vehicle_jo.jpg

Jo’s creation, the Chanel Fiole concept car is breathtaking. Focused on creating a car targeting women that channels the spirit of fashion and beauty, Jo took inspiration from the classic and iconic designs of Coco Chanel. Following the simple yet elegant aesthetic that is trademark Chanel, the main color scheme is black and white. The vehicle has plenty of smooth, sweeping lines reminiscent of fabric or drapery and the rear wheels are concealed by the rear panels. But it wouldn’t be Chanel without the trademark interlocking C’s prominently displayed on the front grille and the rims of the front wheels.

As expected, the interior is just as impressive as the exterior. The Fiole gives off a cockpit feeling with two seats in the front and a third staggered in the back.

While the Chanel Fiole is without a doubt easy on the eyes, but it’s all but guaranteed it won’t be easy on the wallet if it comes into production.

(Via Autoblog)

Watch this YouTube Video without the Flash Player

via Digital Inspiration – Technology Blog by Amit Agarwal on 6/10/09

The next major release of HTML, dubbed HTML 5, will include several new tags for embedding audio, video and other graphical content in web pages.

Currently, your browser needs a plugin to play embedded multimedia content. For instance, you need to install Adobe Flash Player for watching videos on YouTube while the QuickTime player is required for viewing movie trailers that are available on the Apple website.

That may however change because the HTML 5 group has recommended some new tags – <audio> and <video> – that will let you play video files in the browser without the Shockwave Flash plugin.

youtube without flash

You can visit youtube.com/html5 to see the HTML 5 video tag in action.

This may look like a regular YouTube video player but the interesting part is that the YouTube video clip will play just fine even if you disable (or completely remove) the Flash Player from your browser.

You can either use Firefox 3.5, Google Chrome or Safari 4 to view this video but no Internet Explorer.

And here’s a single line of HTML 5 code that was used to embed this video clip on the YouTube page:

<video width="640" height="360" src="file.mp4" autobuffer>  <br>You must have an HTML5 capable browser. </video>

This YouTube page demonstrate some of the capabilities of HTML 5 but it’s nearly impossible predict at this stage if HTML 5 (or the Open Video format promoted by Mozilla) can make any impact on the ubiquitous Flash Player which, some estimates suggest, exists on more than 90% browsers.

The other problem is that none of the older browsers can understand content that’s wrapped inside the <video> tag so you’ll still need to embed your video streams through Flash or an alternate technology like SilverLight.

That said, HTML 5 still looks very interesting and exciting.

iPhone 3GS Processor and RAM Uncovered: 600MHz and 256MB

via Gizmodo by Dan Nosowitz on 6/10/09

T-Mobile Netherlands, the country’s iPhone carrier, posted the processor and RAM on their site that Apple’s been so cagey about confirming, and it’s exactly what we thought: 600MHz CPU (up from 412MHz) and 256MB of RAM, double the previous models.

Even though Apple wouldn’t give us the specific numbers, T-Mobile Netherlands has been a pretty reliable source for leaking things Apple doesn’t quite want known, even new hardware. Besides, those specs are exactly what had been rumored, so we’re just left to wonder why Apple bothered to hide them.

[T-Mobile via iLounge]

What’s the Weirdest Geek Argument You’ve Ever Been In?

via geeksugar by geeksugar on 6/10/09

When I came across Wired’s Top 10 Ways To Provoke a Geek Argument the other day, I had to laugh. This has totally happened to me! I once got into a discussion with a friend about the pros and cons of the Xbox 360 verses the PS3 which turned into a heated argument real fast. Not that I care, since I enjoy both, but my sparring partner had some serious attachment issues to his PS3 that I was not prepared for.

Have you ever been involved in a heated geek argument? I know they happen quite often when talking about tech, so tell us: what’s the weirdest geek argument you’ve ever been in?

Getty

HTC Touch Pro2 Review

via Boy Genius Report by The Boy Genius on 6/10/09

HTC has been seriously the little (now big) engine that could. Does anyone even remember what the T-Mobile Pocket PC (Wallaby) looked like? Now the number one Windows Mobile manufacturer in the world, they show no signs of stopping — they even added Android to their portfolio. But let’s be honest, you’re here to check out the much-awaited update to the viciously popular HTC Touch Pro, the HTC Touch Pro2. So let’s get to steppin’, hit the jump and find out what we really think of the TP2

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Design:

Design is always going to be subjective, right? But you can most of the time appreciate a phone’s industrial design even if it’s not something you’d drop a wad of cash on. The Touch Pro2 is probably one of the sexiest Windows Mobile devices we’ve ever seen. Rounded edges, chrome bezel, huge screen, minimalistic buttons — all great things. What’s even more exciting, however, is that the design is completely functional. There’s not one single thing the designers did that gets in the way of real usability and let’s face it, this device is really the high-end corporate user’s dream device, so there shouldn’t be any complaints in this department.

Hardware / Keyboard:

It’s really exciting to watch newer products being released but it’s a little bit more exciting to see evolutions of previous handsets morph into something else. HTC told us that people really missed not having the tilting screen of the HTC TyTN II so they incorporated that back in. Additionally, people thought the HTC Touch Pro was a little too small and cramped, so they practically made the Touch Pro2 a HTC Touch HD with slide-out QWERTY. And oh man, what a slide-out QWERTY it is. Shaquille O’Neal himself (also a very happy TweetGenius user, might we add) would have zero problems typing on this thing. The keys are very, very spacious and have a great feel to them. It’s a plastic feel which is totally fine, because it’s a quality feel. Something Palm should learn a thing or two from.

On a different note, have we mentioned how absolutely incredible HTC’s new soft keyboard is? Anyone using an HTC Magic or who has installed a non-Google build on their Android device (not a Google version) will know what we’re talking about. It’s almost as good as the iPhone’s keyboard and this is coming from using it on a resistive screen. Really top notch stuff here.

Screen:

If there was a such thing as the world’s greatest, the Touch Pro2’s screen would surely be in the running. It probably wouldn’t win, though. It’s really something HTC has no control over, but the fact that this is a resistive screen as opposed to a capacitive screen is a major strike against it. Really, they can’t do anything about it since Windows Mobile practically makes you use a fingernail to hit menu options. Once you accept the screen is resistive, though, it’s a damn good one. Unlike the Touch Pro where the screen wasn’t as responsive as everyone wished, the Touch Pro2’s screen is incredibly sensitive and responsive — paging through screens, sliding through TouchFLO menus and the like are all smooth as butter.

The actual resolution of the display is 800×480 and it’s a whopping 3.6″ measured diagonally. In addition to being highly responsive, it’s vivid, bright, clear and crisp.

TouchFLO 3D:

We have touched on TouchFLO 3D in many different sections of this review as you have read and will read below. But, to focus on just TouchFLO 3D, a lot has been added since the Touch Diamond and Touch Pro. For starters, it’s finally landscape! If that wasn’t enough, HTC has gone ahead and built upon the Touch HD’s TF3D by adding in a Stocks page, revamped Weather page and a new Calendar page. All extremely welcome additions.

Phone:

What good is a phone if the phone doesn’t work? While voice calling in very old versions of Windows Mobile was a pain in the ass, Windows Mobile 6/6.1 has made it bearable. Luckily HTC’s TouchFLO interface makes it rather enjoyable. Anyone who has used a recent HTC device knows this pretty well, but on the software side, everything is cleanly laid out. Your recent call log is integrated with the dialpad, and you have the option to flip between a standard voice call and a video call. Don’t get excited; that’s for international users only because it’s a carrier-supported feature.

As far as the hardware goes, calls we made and received came through loud and clear. Literally. The ear speaker on the TP2 is a little bit higher than you’d anticipate but you get used to it very quickly and it proved to work without any issues. Volume on the in ear speaker was sufficient enough to provide audible call quality on the streets of New York City and our callers could hear us quite well, too.

Messaging:

HTC has excelled at making Windows Mobile a more-usable platform. What in the hell would the world look like without it? What’s more interesting with the latest version of TouchFLO is the messaging integration. In addition to having phone calling, you’ve now got access to your entire communication history with all of your contacts. Once you click on a specific contact, you’re able to see all the recent calls, all recent emails, all recent text messages, and even Facebook updates all in a neat and clean interface. It’s rather remarkable.

Integration of these features isn’t just skin deep either — you can even click on a contact’s thumbnail image in an email and start a conference call that way as an example. Really cool stuff that’s incredibly useful.

Speakerphone / Conference calling:

This is one of the big selling points of the new Touch Pro2 — the speakerphone and Straight Talk. The brilliant part of HTC’s heavily-customized TouchFLO interface is what they’ve been able to do with conference calling. You can literally just hit 4, or even 5 numbers or contacts, and instantly, the Touch Pro2 will transform from a phone, to a mobile conference room and conference all parties together. You’ll also get options to individually drop certain parties from the call while it’s in progress. But, look, what good is some bad ass conference calling software without some business-grade speakerphone action? As soon as you flip the handset over so the screen is face down on your desk (or whatever surface really), the call will instantly change over to speakerphone. Ok, cool, we guess. Most speakerphones suck and you can barely hear them. Not here, though. Besides being super loud and clear for you to listen to, the Touch Pro2 has got dual microphones. One for noise-cancelling and one to actually pickup your voice for uh, talking. This makes for an absolutely wonderful conference calling experience — it’s the best we’ve ever used on a mobile phone. Plus, if that wasn’t enough, there’s a dedicated mute button right in the middle of the speaker so you can hurl insults and nasty words at your boss while he’s talking. While muted, of course.

Battery life:

The TouchPro2 ships with a large 1500mAh battery and it’s pretty good. HTC quotes talk time over a UMTS connection at a whopping six and half hours. Unfortunately, since our review unit is a Euro-spec unit, we weren’t able to participate in sexy 3G-calling voice tests. Their quoted EDGE talk times are listed at about eight and half hours, and we can pretty much say those numbers are incredibly close to being accurate.

On EDGE and Wi-Fi, our unit constantly got us through a full day of work. This included heavy email using a Microsoft Exchange Server with ActiveSync configured, a ton of web browsing using Opera and Skyfire, staying logged into IM with BeeJive for Windows Mobile, and some light to medium voice calling. On 3G, however, we’re pretty sure our battery life would have been reduced by at least 35%, let’s say. That’s an estimate, but a pretty conservative one. To make two paragraphs short: the Touch Pro2 has very good battery life but your usage patterns will obviously vary, thus your battery will as well.

Connectivity:

It’s pretty much a standard nowadays for any high-end device; quad-band GSM/EDGE, tri-band UMTS, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth 2.0 or higher and GPS. Unfortunately, the Touch Pro2 we reviewed didn’t have three UMTS bands, just two. These are the 900/2100MHz UMTS/HSPA bands that are incompatible with North America’s 3G bands. Since 3G is such a standard feature in today’s world, we couldn’t enjoy the TP2 as much as we’d have liked to. Don’t fret, though — when you get your own Touch Pro2 you’ll be pleased as punch with all the connectivity options loaded in here.

Minor annoyances:

There’s a few things that aren’t quite perfect here. The camera, while being a decent 3.2 megapixel sensor, didn’t get upgraded like the Touch Diamond2 did. We would have loved for a 5 megapixel shooter in here. Additionally HTC has removed the flash module. Handset makers don’t get it twisted — leave the motherloving flash in your phones.

This isn’t much of an annoyance since the hardware works quite well, but in fairness we figured we should point out that the Touch Pro2 actually runs more of the less the same internal hardware as the original Touch Pro did. It’s not a bad thing like we said, but anyone hoping for a major spec bump, you won’t really find it here.

Lastly, there isn’t a directional pad anymore on the front of the device. This isn’t the worst thing to happen, but it was really nice having that on the front part of the Touch Pro to make navigating a little bit easier. The trade off is that the screen is obviously larger which does help when using touch selections as opposed to hardware keys.

Conclusion:

It’s pretty apparent that there will be an HTC Touch Pro2 in your own carrier’s flavor pretty soon. In the U.S. alone, just from leaked photos and information floating around, T-Mobile, AT&T, Sprint and Verizon will all get their own version of the device. What’s even better is that they will all be roughly the same. The keyboards won’t range from usable to world’s dumbest configuration (cough, Touch Pro, cough) and we have a feeling the physical exterior will be pretty close to the stock HTC units as well.

This is an incredibly interesting summer, though. You’ve got this device, the Nokia N97, the Palm Pre, the iPhone 3G S, the Google G2, and a bunch more handsets to choose from. How will you make up your mind? Form factors are pretty similar with the aforementioned devices. Most have a physical QWERTY slide-out or flip up, and all have on screen keyboards except for the Palm Pre. We can’t say that one OS is better than the other for your taste and usage, but we can confidently recommend the Touch Pro2 as the best Windows Mobile device in the world. That might not make your decision any easier, but as long as you’re considering a Windows Mobile phone, the Touch Pro2 is going to be the reigning champ for a long, long time. Or at least until HTC releases the Touch Pro3.

Regardless of what phone you end up choosing, one thing is 100% certain, folks. It’s going to be a hot summer.

New Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Could Last 3 Times Longer Than Lithium-Ion

via Gizmodo by Dan Nosowitz on 6/10/09

Scientists at the University of Waterloo have designed a lithium-sulfur battery that, thanks to nanotechnology, is capable of 3 times the power of lithium-ion batteries with equal volume while remaining both lighter and cheaper to produce. Long-distance electric cars, anyone?

The different atomic structure of the battery and knowledge of nanotechnology are what make this battery different. They used “mesoporous carbon, a material that presents a highly uniform pore structure at nanoscale level,” to allow for a more efficient design:

The team assembled a nanostructure of carbon rods separated by empty channels, sulfur was then melted to fill the tiny voids thanks to capillary forces. All the spaces were uniformly filled with sulfur, thus maximizing the surface area in direct contact with carbon and boosting battery efficiency.

We’ve been needing a new battery technology for awhile now, especially for electric cars, so here’s hoping they can get these lithium-sulfur batteries into production as soon as possible and that they deliver on the possibilities we see here. If it really is capable of three times the batter life, we’re talking about something like a 730-mile range on a Tesla, 20 hours on a MacBook, or half a week on an iPod, all without added bulk or expense!

[Gizmag via DVICE]

MacBook Pro Hands-On Gallery

via Gizmodo by Jason Chen on 6/10/09

We’ve got a delicious gallery of pics of the new 13 and 15-inch MacBook Pros. Wanna know how to swap the locked-in hard drive and battery? We have shots of that too.

Just by looking at the 13 and 15-inch models together, you can tell that Apple was pretty much right when they said that they belong in the same family. The construction is almost identical. The only difference is that the 13-inch has one fewer audio jack and no side-board speakers, as been the case for the 13 for years now.