Time-Lapse Video – One Year in One Minute

Seasonal changes over a year in 60 seconds

Eirik Solheim has been diligently recording video clips of the same spot from his balcony that overlooks a beautiful park in Oslo, Norway.

He would shoot 30-second videos once every week throughout the year, thus capturing all the four seasons, and then compiled all these clips into a single time-lapse video. Thanks Steve.

Eirik made three versions of the video each recorded using a different camera lens. Here are the other two:

One year in 120 seconds



One year in 90 seconds


Also see: Time-Lapse Video of Manhattan Skyline


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What’s Inside the Google Phone

Video: Nexus One Disassembled

If you are wondering what’s inside Nexus One, check this slideshow at iFixit*. They bought a new phone and completely disassembled it using a Phillips screwdriver.

Google Phone Battery Cover Opening the Nexus One
Inside Nexus One Google Phone Disassembled




Photo: stunning 648 megapixel image of the Milky Way

via DVICE Atom Feed by Kevin Hall on 11/2/09

Photo: stunning 648 megapixel image of the Milky Way

Physicist Axel Mellinger spent nearly two years traveling 26,000 miles across South Africa, Texas and Michigan. What does he have to show for it? Well, he’s cobbled together a stunning 648 megapixel panorama of the Milky Way as seen from Earth, using 3,000 individual photographs. The Central Michigan University professor wants to make the image available for planetariums, as it’s large enough to serve educational purposes. It even shows stars that are 1,000 times too faint to be seen by the human eye, so this is a Milky Way like you’ve never seen.

Here’s a larger view, the largest Mellinger offers for personal use. (Before you blame him, the prof spent countless man hours putting this thing together. It only makes sense that there’s a cost to admission, and I bet that fee is well worth the price. There’s an interactive version you can play with here.)

A-Color-All-Sky-Panorama-Image-of-the-Milky-Way-by-Axel-Mellinger-2.jpg

From the University of Chicago:

Piecing together 3000 individual photographs, a physicist has made a new high-resolution panoramic image of the full night sky, with the Milky Way galaxy as its centerpiece. Axel Mellinger, a professor at Central Michigan University, describes the process of making the panorama in the forthcoming issue of Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. An interactive version of the picture can viewed on Mellinger’s website.

“This panorama image shows stars 1000 times fainter than the human eye can see, as well as hundreds of galaxies, star clusters and nebulae,” Mellinger said. Its high resolution makes the panorama useful for both educational and scientific purposes, he says.

Mellinger spent 22 months and traveled over 26,000 miles to take digital photographs at dark sky locations in South Africa, Texas and Michigan. After the photographs were taken, “the real work started,” Mellinger said.

Simply cutting and pasting the images together into one big picture would not work. Each photograph is a two-dimensional projection of the celestial sphere. As such, each one contains distortions, in much the same way that flat maps of the round Earth are distorted. In order for the images to fit together seamlessly, those distortions had to be accounted for. To do that, Mellinger used a mathematical model-and hundreds of hours in front of a computer.

Another problem Mellinger had to deal with was the differing background light in each photograph.

“Due to artificial light pollution, natural air glow, as well as sunlight scattered by dust in our solar system, it is virtually impossible to take a wide-field astronomical photograph that has a perfectly uniform background,” Mellinger said.

To fix this, Mellinger used data from the Pioneer 10 and 11 space probes. The data allowed him to distinguish star light from unwanted background light. He could then edit out the varying background light in each photograph. That way they would fit together without looking patchy.

The result is an image of our home galaxy that no star-gazer could ever see from a single spot on earth. Mellinger plans to make the giant 648 megapixel image available to planetariums around the world.

Axel Mellinger, via University of Chicago, via Examiner, via io9