Alienware Curved Monitor Looks Like It’s From Another Planet

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The sighting: We can’t have one of these Alienware curved monitors until the second half of this year, but until then, we’ve been abducted by its four nearly seamless and sharp screens of DLP goodness. Lit by LEDs, this 2880×900 monster is well over three feet wide and is said to have an other-worldly .02ms (we think!) response time, great for gaming. The Soylent Green: You can see the seams between this monitor’s four segments, but the Alienware humanoids tell us that flaw will be gone by the time this craft lands on Earth. The blacks look a bit washed out to our eyes, too. Price is yet to be determined.

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Are you getting all the HDTV resolution you paid for?

Not necessarily, given the results of Home Theater Mag’s recent tests of 61 HDTVs. Using test patterns from a Silicon Optix HQV HD DVD, they tested deinterlacing, 3:2 detection and for the 1080p sets, bandwidth. Unfortunately, just over 54% of the HDTVs failed the deinterlacing test, 80% failed the 3:2 test, but the 1080p sets passed the bandwidth test, despite all but one (Pioneer Elite PRO-FHD1) losing some detail. If a HDTV doesn’t pass these tests, then you’re losing at least some visual information from a 1080i signal. Some televisions throw away half the horizontal lines, which results in a fail on the deinterlacing test, or don’t perform inverse telecine on moving images appropriately, failing the 3:2 test. Of course, contrast ratio, refresh rate and black levels still contribute to overall picture quality, but you should take a look at their results to make sure you’re getting every pixel you expected from your new HDTV.

[Thanks, Ryan]