Introducing the iPhone… (finally!)

Capping literally years of speculation on perhaps the most intensely followed unconfirmed product in Apple’s history — and that’s saying a lot — the iPhone has been announced today. Yeah, we said it: “iPhone,” the name the entire free world had all but unanimously christened it from the time it’d been nothing more than a twinkle in Stevie J’s eye (comments, Cisco?). Sweet, glorious specs of the 11.6 millimeter device (that’s frickin’ thin, by the way) include a 3.5-inch 480 x 320 touchscreen display with multi-touch support and a proximity sensor to turn off the sensor when it’s close to your face, 2 megapixel cam, 4GB or 8 GB of storage, Bluetooth with EDR and A2DP, WiFi that automatically engages when in range, and quadband GSM radio with EDGE. Perhaps most amazingly, though, it somehow runs OS X with support for Widgets, Google Maps, and Safari, and iTunes (of course) with CoverFlow out of the gate. A partnership with Yahoo will allow all iPhone customers to hook up with free push IMAP email. Apple quotes 5 hours of battery life for talk or video, with a full 16 hours in music mode — no word on standby time yet. In a twisted way, this is one rumor mill we’re almost sad to see grind to a halt; after all, when is the next time we’re going to have an opportunity to run this picture? The 4GB iPhone will go out the door in the US as a Cingular exclusive for $499 on a two-year contract, 8GB for $599. Ships Stateside in June, Europe in fourth quarter, Asia in 2008.

The basics:

  • Single front button.
  • 3.5 inch widescreen display featuring the highest pixel density ever shipped in a portable device.
  • 2 megapixel camera.
  • iPod dock.
  • Proximity sensor which switches between modes and screen orientation based on how a user holds it.
  • 11.6 mm thick.
  • Syncs with iTunes
  • GSM/EDGE
  • Wifi
  • Bluetooth
  • Cinglar only.
  • Visual voicemail – shows a list of your voicemails like you see a list of emails.
  • Error correcting on-screen keyboard.
  • Gestural interface
  • Mail.
  • Safari.
  • Google Maps.
  • Widgets.
  • Switches seamlessly between EDGE and WiFi.
  • Free Yahoo! IMAP email to all iPhone customs.
  • GPS
  • 5 hour video battery life.
  • 16 hour audio battery life.

The 4GB costs $499 and the 8GB $599 (includes a 2 year contract). It is shipping in June.
















































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GPS, GSM Cellphone Jammers Hit Mainstream, Calamity Ensues

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Don’t get too reliant on that GPS receiver, Magellan, since companies are now starting to release devices that locally block GPS signals. Detectnu’s device not only block GPS signals within a 50-meter (164-foot) radius, but also GSM cellphone signals in a 20-meter (65-foot) radius. Another such device—the RJ-G1575 GPS jammer from Radixon Hadrian—blocks GPS signals in a 50-kilometer (31-mile) radius. Now, I can completely understand cellphone jammers (hint: people have no concept of tact in New York City and love to yap about God knows what quite loudly), but blocking GPS? What good does that do, other than give mischief makers a rise?

Ok, so Radixon Hadarian claims that the device can be used to thwart GPS-aided terrorist attacks. Yes, and I’m Jack Bauer. Let’s leave the crime fighting to the professionals and not to gadget geeks.

Detectnu GPS/GSM Jammer [Alibab.com]

Radixon Hadrian RJ-G1575 [Grove Enterprises via The Red Ferret Journal]

Motorola ROKR E6 Passes FCC, Linux Fanboys Throw Awkward High Fives

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The Motorola ROKR E6, or E690 as the engineers call it, was just approved by the FCC, much to Linux fans’ delight. It will follow up older ROKR phones, possibly with iTunes capabilities, and will run Motorola’s Linux OS.

The phone will have a touchscreen instead of a keypad, and will be loaded with a 2-megapixel camera, FM transmitter, and stereo Bluetooth capabilities. The iTunes integration seems like a long shot, seeing as this runs Linux. But, it does have GSM capabilities, which means it may be in your Cingular-stained hands someday soon. If you’re looking for a break from the “me too” pretty, but low functionality thin phones, this may be the one for you.

FCC Filing [FCC via Crunchgear]