iPhone unlocked: AT&T loses iPhone exclusivity

It’s high noon, Apple and AT&T — we really hate to break it to you, but the jig is up. Last night the impossible was made possible: right in front of our very eyes we witnessed a full SIM unlock of our iPhone with a small piece of software. It’s all over, guys.

The iPhoneSIMfree.com team called us up to prove their claim that they cracked Apple’s iPhone SIM lock system, and prove it they did. (No, we don’t have a copy of the unlock software, so don’t even ask us, ok?) The six-man team has been working non-stop since launch day, and they’re officially the first to break Apple’s SIM locks on the iPhone. It’s done. Seriously. They wouldn’t tell us when and how they would release it to the public, but you can certainly bet that they’ll try to make a buck on their solution (and rightly so). We can hardly believe the iPhone’s finally been cracked. No, scratch that — we just can’t believe it took this long.

Again: we can confirm with 100% certainty that iPhoneSIMfree.com’s software solution completely SIM unlocks the iPhone, is restore-resistant, and should make the iPhone fully functional for users outside of the US. Read on for details and links to our video, and check out the gallery of images below.


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How To: Install Nintendo Games and Play With Tactile Feedback in Your iPhone

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Unlike the original version, the NES emulator for the iPhone works great now —except for the sound. There’s still one big problem: the lack of tactile feedback on the buttons. Natetrue, the creator of iBrickr, came up with an ingenious hardware patch: a transparent vinyl layer cut like the gamepad buttons. It seems silly, but it works. Jump to see a demonstration video and learn how to install the NES emulator plus your favorite games in the iPhone (for Windows and Mac OS X.)

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iPhone Field Test Mode Lets You Spy On The AT&T Network

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Richard Baguley, chief cellular ninja over at WirelessInfo.com, just published a number that, when called, turns your iPhone into a mobile field testing station. Suddenly, up pops a new menu (as you can see on our own iPhone at left) that provides detailed reporting on strengths and characteristics of the cell towers in your area, plus a load of other nerdy networky factoids. In other words, you can see things that AT&T might not want you to see.

What’s cool is that you can even enter field test mode during a call just by tapping the iPhone’s “Add Call” icon, then the field test number. But before I give you this magic number, it is my duty to share Richard’s warning.

NOTE: Although it seems that most of the information is read-only (so you can’t change anything), field modes like this have the potential to damage your phone and possibly interfere with the phone network. We are providing this information as-is; we cannot be held responsible if anything you do in this field mode damages your phone or the phone network.

There, now that the warning is out of the way, here you go:

*3001#12345#*

Dial that, and have fun fiddling. If you do discover anything freaky, please report back to us, and, of course, to Richard. If you whack out your iPhone in the process, don’t come crying to me.
[WirelessInfo.com]

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iPhone Hackers: "we have owned the filesystem"

The kooky hacking kids over at IRC channel #iphone claim to have gained full ownership of the iPhone filesystem. In an update titled “How to Escape Jail,” they highlight the technical steps required to enable custom ringtones, wallpapers and more for your iPhone. They have not released a tool for general consumption — yet — but do provide the picture above as evidence of their hacking skillz.

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Harry Potter Hacked?

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t’s very unlikely, but someone claims to have hacked into the publishing house that distributes the Harry Potter books (Bloomsbury) and obtained the final manuscript of the soon-to-arrive 7th book. This man (kid) supposedly got into the computers of the publisher by sending a link to a browser exploit through email and having the publisher click on it.

Don’t click if you don’t want potential spoilers.

Harry Potter 0day [Seclists via The Inquirer]

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Safari for Windows, Bugs-a-Plenty

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Now it makes sense why Apple released Safari for Windows. Steve must love his Windows security jokes so much that he decided Apple should create a browser that exploits them even more.

Currently only six bugs have been found. Four involving Safari crashing & two that allow remote code to be launched. Currently there’s no official word on whether or not these can be recreated on its OS X counterpart. So for now we’ll call this a sneak attack, or maybe a beta. Yeah, beta sounds better

Security researchers: Safari for Windows not so secure [CNet]

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