Book review: The Philosophy of Space and Time

It took me a few months to finally read this book, but it was well worth it. I have been reading it prior to sleep as it was so full of information that it was difficult to read more than ten pages without taking a break to think about all of the new ideas. Furthermore, the information was presented in such an accessible manner that even those who are not specialists in relativity, topology or physics can appreciate the message.

I selected this book because I figured the topic was far away from electrical engineering that it could give a new perspective on understanding what is implied by measuring time and distance. Sure enough, this book provided many insights into the nature of our universe through the relation of time and space measurement. I will avoid summarizing the book, however, I will mention that it would be a pleasant read for those interested in non-Eucledian coordinates and the effects of gravitational fields. The book is extremely well written and reads much like a lecture series where the audience does not need to be able to carry out all of the steps of each operation, but acquires a taste for the process and a deeper appreceation. From the point of view of technical written English, this was one of the most understandable books on a physical subject that I have read in some time.

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Nokia E71 review

via Engadget Mobile by Paul Miller on 6/19/08

While Nokia makes a habit of practically defining “featurephone” for the industry, traditionally it’s handsets like the N95 that hog all the spotlight, leaving Nokia’s few QWERTY phones in the shadows. Not that they’ve been trying too hard — while the E62 and E61i have both shipped over here, neither has featured 3G data in US bands, and the E62 even had the distinct pleasure of having WiFi stripped out. Enter E71, the successor to those phones, and Nokia’s very first QWERTY device to feature US-friendly 3G.

Nokia is also (finally) taking form factor much more seriously: at 10mm thick, the E71 is one of the slimmest Nokia phones to date, and Nokia claims it’s the thinnest QWERTY smartphone on the market. The E71 also attacks the drab, plastic looks of its predecessors with chrome accents and a glossy screen. The phone is incredibly pocketable, and comfortable to hold and use. Of course, with the smaller size Nokia had to cut down on screen real estate and keyboard spacing, but at a QVGA resolution there’s little suffering on that front. The keyboard had a much more rigid, clicky feel to it compared to the spongy keys of the E62, and we were virtually typo-free on it within minutes.

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