Researchers use PS3 cluster to reveal internet security flaw

via PS3 Fanboy by Andrew Yoon on 12/30/08

Stopping cancer, simulating black hole collisions, and now … breaking internet security? Is there anything the PS3 can’t do? Researchers have been using the PS3 in interng ways. Most recently, a team of researchers from the U.S., Switzerland and the Netherlands have found a way of bypassing the security of digital certificates provided by companies like Verisign. These digital certificates help transmit your credit card information on the internet in a secure manner.

By using 200 PS3 systems linked together, researchers were able to do the math that helped them decrypt the MD5 hash that’s used by Verisign. The researchers would be able to mimic online retail sites, potentially stealing tons of valuable information from consumers. It appears researchers want the hash to be replaced by a more potent one.

It’s unrealistic to expect hackers will be able to replicate the results of these researchers any time soon. Getting 200 PS3s linked to each other can be quite a pricey feat! Of course, when you’re stealing all of the internet’s credit card info, you might be able to afford buying a few hundred PS3s.

[Thanks, BPerry!]

Livedrive provides unlimited online storage

via Download Squad by Brad Linder on 12/24/08
Livedrive

Livedrive is an online storage service that offers two advantages over most services in this space:

  1. Unlimited file storage
  2. Integration with Windows Explorer

When you install Livedrive (and reboot your computer), you’ll notice an L drive show up in Windows Explorer. To copy files to the service, just drag and drop them to the L drive. You can also upload and download files through a web-based interface. And once your files are online you’ll be able to access them from any computer using the web client.

Thanks to the Windows Explorer integration, you could easily use LiveDrive as an offsite backup tool like Carbonite or Mozy. Just install your favorite file backup utility and point it to the L drive.

Livedrive is free while in beta, but I have a feeling the company will probably start charging a fee when the beta ends.

[via Lifehacker]