Pre-Order the Sharp Mebius NJ70A Netbook With LCD Multitouch Trackpad

via Gizmodo by Sean Fallon on 4/23/09

The Sharp Mebius NJ70A Netbook definitely turns some heads with its touchscreen LCD trackpad. Interested parties can now pre-order the Mebius for $999 for a June 5th ship date.

[Dynamism via Crunchgear]

Sharp launches charity drive with a 26-foot tower of 43 LCD TVs to be raffle…

via DVICE by Kevin Hall on 12/1/08

Sharp-43-LCD-TV-Grand-Central.jpg

It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas over at New York City’s Grand Central Terminal. Sharp helped deck the halls by sponsoring the Grand Central Terminal Kaleidoscope Light Show, which lit up the main concourse with a holiday-themed laser light show set to cheery Christmas tunes.

Sharp’s biggest contribution? A 26-foot-tall, Christmas-tree-shaped stack of 43 LCDs of varying sizes (from 19 inches to 52) — and each TV is up for grabs. For every person who enters the giveaway to score a free Sharp Aquos TV, the electronics giant will donate $1 to the HOPE Program. Jump in there and start registering: Sharp will donate up to $100,000, which could really do well by HOPE, a program that helps folks get back on their feet and promotes environmentally-sustainable employment.

Check out the gallery below for more of Sharp’s LCD Christmas tree, and shots of the Grand Central Terminal Kaleidoscope Light Show.

Via Sharp Aquos Experience Sweepstakes

Forget LCD; Go for Plasma, Says Maker of Both

What kind of company takes out ads in daily newspapers attacking one of its own type of products? In the case of Panasonic, the answer is a company that has significant investments in a rival technology.

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Flat-panel televisions at a computer store in Santa Clara, Calif. Panasonic has promoted its plasma sets over L.C.D. ones.

Panasonic, the consumer electronics company owned by Matsushita Electric Industrial, is the world’s biggest seller of plasma TVs. And it has long extolled the benefits of that technology compared with L.C.D., another flat-panel TV product. At the same time, the company sells a full line of L.C.D. sets.

But the company believes that plasma technology is under unfair attack from competitors making “desperate attempts” to denigrate what it sees as plasma’s superiority, according to Bob Greenberg, Panasonic’s vice president for brand marketing.

There is another issue as well, which is that the profit margins on L.C.D. TVs have fallen sharply because of competition.

To demonstrate plasma is better, the company has offered picture comparisons for journalists at electronics shows. And it has developed marketing materials that dispel some of the myths of plasma’s limitations, like how often to refill the plasma gas (never) and the problems with picture burn-in (none anymore).

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This holiday, Panasonic went a step further, running an ad in newspapers around the country under the heading “Six facts you need to know before you buy a large flat-panel TV.” The ad points out plasma’s superior contrast, color rendition, crisp motion, viewing angle and durability when compared to L.C.D. TVs.

Not so fast, says Sony. The company, which exited the plasma TV market to concentrate on L.C.D. sets, is running its own series of sportslike newspaper and magazine ads that promote what it calls an HD challenge. Once consumers see reflections of fluorescent lighting in the plasma set, they will opt for L.C.D., the ad contends.

While most people do not have fluorescent lights in their living rooms, Sony believes its challenge shows how bright light bulbs and other reflections can spoil a picture.

“The showroom is the only place where a consumer can compare two TVs,” said Phil Abram, the company’s vice president of product marketing.

To help Panasonic maintain sales of both technologies, it sells plasma sets from 37 to 65 inches on the diagonal, while its L.C.D. TVs can only be purchased in sizes from 23 to 32 inches. Sony, Sharp and other manufacturers sell L.C.D. sets from 19 to 65 inches on the diagonal.

Panasonic also looks to segregate the market. The company argues that L.C.D. TVs, which look brighter in daylight, are the right choice for kitchens and other rooms that need smaller sizes. But in larger sizes and for fast-moving sports scenes, plasma is the right choice, said Mr. Greenberg. Since the ad campaign began, “field research shows that the dialogue is changing. Once you point out that the blacks in plasma are blacker than in L.C.D., it is like pointing out the rabbit in the painting.”

Both technologies are gaining market share at the expense of traditional tube sets, with L.C.D. sales this year overtaking picture tube sets for the first time.

According to data compiled by the NPD Group, L.C.D. TVs held 49 percent of the market in 2006, compared with 26 percent last year. Plasma’s market share increased to 10 percent from 5 percent. At the same time, sales of picture tube TVs dropped by more than half, to 21 percent this year from 46 percent in 2005.

Does Panasonic’s strong support of plasma technology mean that it will never sell a very large L.C.D. TV? Well, not exactly.

“Panasonic in Japan is studying L.C.D. in its larger formats,” Mr. Greenberg said. “If we introduce larger-sized L.C.D. TVs, we will have overcome the problems in that technology.”

Are you getting all the HDTV resolution you paid for?

Not necessarily, given the results of Home Theater Mag’s recent tests of 61 HDTVs. Using test patterns from a Silicon Optix HQV HD DVD, they tested deinterlacing, 3:2 detection and for the 1080p sets, bandwidth. Unfortunately, just over 54% of the HDTVs failed the deinterlacing test, 80% failed the 3:2 test, but the 1080p sets passed the bandwidth test, despite all but one (Pioneer Elite PRO-FHD1) losing some detail. If a HDTV doesn’t pass these tests, then you’re losing at least some visual information from a 1080i signal. Some televisions throw away half the horizontal lines, which results in a fail on the deinterlacing test, or don’t perform inverse telecine on moving images appropriately, failing the 3:2 test. Of course, contrast ratio, refresh rate and black levels still contribute to overall picture quality, but you should take a look at their results to make sure you’re getting every pixel you expected from your new HDTV.

[Thanks, Ryan]